spilled pills

An estimated 4 million people are poisoned in the United States each year – 60% of those people are children under the age of six. Children aged one to three are at the highest risk. Common household poisons include any kind of medicine, iron pills, cleaning products, cosmetics and personal care products, pesticides, pool chemicals, gasoline, motor oil, and other automotive supplies, alcohol, tobacco products, and hobby and craft supplies.

Please read the articles and check out the links found on this page to find out how to protect yourself and your loved ones from accidental poisoning.

Please read the articles and check out the links found on this page to find out more about mold and issues related to it.

Articles/Links

Mold In My Home - What Do I Do?

Mold Resources - Environmental Protection Agency

Mold Facts - Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Mold - CT Dept. of Public Health

Related Issues

Sanitary Sewer Back-ups:  Info and Clean Up

 

Radon test kits are available in our four office locations.

Click here for office locations

The test kit should be left in the lowest living level of your home for 3 to 7 days, then mail it away in the postage paid envelope included. Results are mailed to you in several weeks or may be accessed online.

Cost $8.00

Articles

"A Citizen's Guide to Radon"  (EPA)

Have You Tested Your Home for Radon? January 5, 2017

cleaning products in bucket

The District Board of Health adopted a resolution concerning the usage of healthy cleaning products and practices at their meeting on November 20, 2008.

The resolution recognizes that exposure to harmful chemicals may result in potential negative impacts to human health.  The District resolved to take measures for the use and procurement of cleaning products having properties that minimize potential negative impacts to human health and the environment, consistent with maintaining clean and sanitary facilities.

The Board of Health encourages member towns to adopt such a policy and to implement procedures through their municipal departments to procure and use, whenever practicable, cleaning products having properties that minimize potential negative impacts to human health and the environment, consistent with maintaining clean and sanitary facilities.  Businesses and residents are encouraged to do the same.

Please visit the links provided to learn more about purchasing and using healthy cleaning products.

Private wells are regulated by the District to ensure proper location and installation, and a safe water supply. The District ensures compliance with the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection, Well Drilling Regulations, Section 25-126 through 137 and 25-128-1 through 64, and the Connecticut Public Health Code, Section 19-13-B51a-m and 19-13-B101.

An application for a permit to install a new well must be completed by a licensed well driller and approved by the District before drilling begins. Following installation of the well, a well completion report must be completed by the well driller and approved by the District. After the well installation is approved, a water sample must be collected to show that the well meets acceptable water quality standards.

Complaints or requests for additional information concerning private water supplies should be directed to the Sanitarian at the appropriate District office.

Public wells are regulated by the Connecticut Department of Public Health with assistance from the District. There are nine public wells in the District which are jointly overseen including restaurants, motels and private clubs. The Connecticut Department of Public Health along with the District ensure compliance with CT Public Health Code, Section 19-13-B102.